The spooky sounds of Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein

November 11, 2017
Author - Katherine Fox

Just in case you’re new here, let’s get something clear straight away: we’re big fans of Stranger Things at Funkhaus.

There’s nothing better than a thriller that simultaneously gives you all the feels—and happens to have a killer soundtrack.

Crafted by Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein, the Stranger Things soundtrack is everything the score for a television show set in the 80s should be: synth-focused, compelling, and able to tell a story all on its own. Dixon and Stein make up half of the Austin, Texas-based band S U R V I V E, and received Grammy nominations in the Best Score/Soundtrack for Visual Media for the music created for season one of the series. They were the only television show in that category, and it’s easy to understand why. Just listen.

Even without the images of Mike and Eleven’s budding love or Steve Harrington playing the Mr. Do Good we all knew he was deep down, the tunes on the three Stranger Things albums (Stranger Things Vol. 1, Stranger Things Vol. 2, Stranger Things 2, respectively) paint an eerie picture of a story worth telling.

The tracks they crafted perfectly compliment both of the spooky seasons, and earlier this week, Dixon and Stein gave Stranger Things fans a whole new way to experience the tunes by performing live at the Theater at Ace Hotel. Still reeling from binge watching the entire second season, fans of the show gathered in the equally spooky venue to watch Dixon and Stein play the music live.

The score filled the venue and fans cheered as the recognizable Stranger Things opening credits song was played.

The walls shook and the audience sat mesmerized as fog and lights colored the stage—it was as if LA had been transformed into the Upside Down. Dixon and Stein played in the shadows onstage, letting the music shine and take on an even scarier and darker tone than the one that comes through on television.

And then, suddenly, it was over. We’re already counting down the days to season 3, but until then we will be listening to Dixon and Stein’s musical musings on repeat.